Publications

Background: Cervical cancer, a common cause of death among women, is attributable to human papilloma virus (HPV). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can potentially alter the incidence of cervical cancer. Prophylactic HPV vaccines are a major advance against cervical cancer. Epidemiological research on HPV and cervical cancer is therefore justified.

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Background:
Antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis effectively reduces mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). However, it is unclear whether stopping ARVs after breastfeeding cessation affects maternal HIV disease progression. We assessed 18-24-month postpartum disease progression risk among women in a randomized trial assessing efficacy and safety of prophylactic maternal ARVs.

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Dr. Avina Sarna has defended her doctoral thesis with success on Friday July 8th 2011
Title: Sexual Behaviours of People Living with HIV: Implications for Prevention with Positives

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Dr. Scott Geibel had defendes his doctoral thesis with success on Thursday July 7th 2011
Title:  Same-sex behaviour of men in Kenya: Implications for HIV prevention, programs and policy

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Dr. Jerry Okoth Okal has defended his doctoral thesis with success on Wednesday July 6th 2011
PhD titel : Sexual and Reproductive Health Risks among key populations Vulnerable to HIV in Kenya

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Dr. Wim Delva defended his PhD entitled: 'Sexual Behaviour and the spread of HIV - Statistical and epideliological modelling applications' on May 10th 2010

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Human papillomavirus (HPV) and HIV are each responsible for a considerable burden of disease. Interactions between these infections pose substantial public health challenges, especially where HIV prevalence is high and HPV vaccine coverage low.

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Objective: To assess the effects of HIV infection on morbidity and the needs of infected women for services in the first year postpartum.

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OBJECTIVE: To assess validity of Pap smears in diagnosing bacterial vaginosis. METHOD: A prospective diagnostic accuracy study with 533 women in Mombasa, Kenya. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis using clinical observations scored with simplified Amsel's criteria and Bethesda system for Pap smears was compared with a reference standard (Nugent criteria for gram stains). Both laboratory tests were interpreted blindly.

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